Project types

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by garce, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. garce

    garce Registered

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    I found that I end up submerge in too many projects. Two types:
    1. Project that I truly own
    2. Projects that are other people's request

    Do you differentiate these two?
    For #1 I need to be on top, monitoring, planning, pushing, protecting of risks, etc
    For #2, well I get to them when I get to them
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  2. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

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    You can:
    -- accept the request and it becomes the "project that you truly own";
    -- reject the request and it is not your project.
     
  3. garce

    garce Registered

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    Thanks, I understand that that would be appropriate in certain context (business owner taking/rejecting cutomer business)
    However, working in a Corporation, the situation is much different. Vague, grey areas, not clear or changing goals, etc

    Appreciate other comments
     
  4. RS356

    RS356 Registered

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    @garce, if I understand correctly, you have some projects that you are accountable for the outcome to a boss/supervisor. In the corporate world, I'd imagine that these are part of your work plan that you and your supervisor have agreed upon, or projects that you yourself have undertaken to meet your own personal goals. Failure is generally not an option. On the other hand, you're good at what you do, so your coworkers ask you for input on their own projects, but these don't directly align with your predefined work.

    I think @TesTeq's advice (as I understand it) is insightful: each of these types of projects represents a commitment you've made to yourself. By accepting the request, you are holding yourself accountable for some portion of the outcome. You "truly own" all of your projects, and each requires its own level of planning, monitoring, and pushing toward a desired outcome.

    In my own corporate (and non-corporate) experience, if I found that when my project list is unclear or overwhelming, I review my higher horizons. This often provides the clarity and confidence to abandon or politely reject some projects, defer others, and focus on the highest impact work. An open line of communication with my supervisor has been key in helping me prioritize my projects on a strategic level.
     
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  5. garce

    garce Registered

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    @RS356 , do you review your project list once a week per gtd?
     
  6. RS356

    RS356 Registered

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    @garce, Yes, I review it a minimum of once per week, but often several times per week.
     
  7. Castanea_d.

    Castanea_d. Registered

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    I'm in a small-staff situation (five employees, plus the rector who is our supervisor/boss) where meetings and group projects do not operate in a GTD manner. It is rare that a meeting ends up with specific next-steps, who is responsible for what, etc., and I am absolutely not in a position to change any of this. So there are a lot of things "out there" for which none of us have specific responsibility.

    I end up working to some degree in the two-level mode with which Garce began this thread: there are certain TBDs and projects that are specific to my job as the church's organist/choirmaster. I give those higher priority. But I also help my coworkers with whatever they are working on. Likewise, they help me. If any of us see something headed for the ditch, two or three of us will get together and figure out how to get it done. At that level, I do have some GTD influence; everyone knows that I always want to know the next step and who is taking it. A couple of my coworkers make fun of my system, but they envy my empty "in" box!

    Having said all of that, I agree with TesTeq (above in the thread) that if I specifically tell one of my coworkers "Yes, I'll help with that," it is now one of my projects too, and I must own it at the same level as something that is my specific job, such as selecting hymns for next Sunday.
     
  8. AnneMKE

    AnneMKE Registered

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    There's a nice article relating to this on the Next Action Associates blog that was also published on GTD Connect, so I assume/hope it's okay to cite; it's here, https://www.next-action.eu/2017/02/02/is-that-yours/ The takeaway for me is that the English language is rich enough to contain a verb that specifically captures our own role, when we have one, in a project that involves others. "Support Tim in submitting sales analysis for sector XYZ" is an example in the article. Tim's project is to submit the analysis, but the manager has decided that instead of fully delegating it, she will also hold herself responsible for the project of supporting him.
     

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