Hanging files question, GTD 2001 vs 2015

Sarahsuccess

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The GTD book published in 2001 recommends "getting rid of hanging files if you can" (page 100). David Allen recommends doing away with hanging file hardware and using only plain manila folders standing up by themselves. He says it's easier and more efficient. I would also think not using hanging files would make more space available in the drawer. However, the 2015 GTD book does not mention doing away with hanging files. Why was it taken out? What is recommended today in 2022? Does anyone have experience they can share with doing away with the (usually green) hanging file folders, and using only manila folders in a file cabinet?
Thanks,
Sarah
 

mcogilvie

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The GTD book published in 2001 recommends "getting rid of hanging files if you can" (page 100). David Allen recommends doing away with hanging file hardware and using only plain manila folders standing up by themselves. He says it's easier and more efficient. I would also think not using hanging files would make more space available in the drawer. However, the 2015 GTD book does not mention doing away with hanging files. Why was it taken out? What is recommended today in 2022? Does anyone have experience they can share with doing away with the (usually green) hanging file folders, and using only manila folders in a file cabinet?
Thanks,
Sarah
I use only regular Manila folders with a blocking plate at home (2 full-size file cabinets), but use hanging files at work. I don't use either one as much anymore, but they both work ok at low to medium volumes (measured in units of today’s torrents of information). If I had to store most information on paper today, I would collapse. There may have been a marginal advantage for one over the other in 2001, but in 2022 it’s small compared to overall volume.
 

gtdstudente

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While pricey buggers, open incline wire filers/sorters are the ultimate in file retrieval-&-return commonly/mostly used for Project/NA support materials? Also, when it comes to office file cabinets, if I may be respectfully bold and say ALWAYS use a 'marker' [colored file, clothes-pin, anything, etc. ] when removing a file for its easiest, non-thinking return to its particular location/place in the drawer? Another way to relieve oneself of "hanging folders," is by using a clean brick or perhaps two vertically positioned hand weights, to do a few arm curls when doing any 'file management', etc. Which reminds me, random exercising is so efficiently healthy, like when going up the home stairs, I do a few 'stair-ups [angled push-ups],' a practice that had me gratefully receive a kind random bicep compliment from my good police officer friend. Ps. The color coding is simply present here to help me affirm/reinforce my four Areas-of-Focus, as a marginal 'pay-back' for posting, all good? Meanwhile, Please be GTD well, thank you
 
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gtdstudente

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The yellow is most difficult for me, Perhaps acolor with more of an orange tone? Or purple or brown?
Thank you, agreed the Yellow is to difficult to see and really suppose to be Gold to represent the Divine, and quite personally, with all sincerity,
being 3/8 Irish, 1/8 English, and 1/2 Italian, Orange is a very painful/sensitive/touchy color . . . able to forgive . . . unable to forget . . . my bad . . . thank you
 
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schmeggahead

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I would also think not using hanging files would make more space available in the drawer.
My primary reference system is just the file folders. I would not have enough space if I used them.
In the joint files for our household, I use hanging files because of my wife's preference.
I also use hanging files for project support because I am retrieving them more often (and that drawer has no movable backstop).

So for me, it really is based upon use. I really like it for my general reference to omit the hanging folders.
Clayton.

P.S. I enjoy the two versions of the book. The differences help me with understanding.
 

thomasbk

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Using the hanging files is helpful for grouping. For instance, I have "Health Insurance — Me" and "Health Insurance — Husband" in a single hanging file. Ultimately, I don't think it matters whether you use hanging files or not as much as that you're filing things away in folders organized with labels from a label maker. (The label maker is non-negotiable, as discussed elsewhere. ;) )
 

Murray

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I use manilla folders, no hanging files.

I never worked out what kind of doodad (spacing block etc?) to order to fit in my particular file drawer, so I learned to make do with a combination of small cardboard boxes and different thickness books to hold up my files and I adjust this as I add or remove files. Seems to work fine although it's not like I'm in and out of there super frequently.
 

Botany_Bill

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I use hanging files for my paper ticker system. I can't imagine just using non-hanging folders for this. It would just be a headache trying to keep them from falling when a hanging folder is so useful as-is
 
The GTD book published in 2001 recommends "getting rid of hanging files if you can" (page 100). David Allen recommends doing away with hanging file hardware and using only plain manila folders standing up by themselves. He says it's easier and more efficient. I would also think not using hanging files would make more space available in the drawer. However, the 2015 GTD book does not mention doing away with hanging files. Why was it taken out? What is recommended today in 2022? Does anyone have experience they can share with doing away with the (usually green) hanging file folders, and using only manila folders in a file cabinet?
Thanks,
Sarah
I don't know why the reference to hanging files was removed from the 2015 book. I have a David Allen guide to General Reference Filing which seems to be dated 2016 and still argues the case for getting rid of hanging files.It also gives recommendations on optimal use of hanging files "if you absolutely have to use [them]". I don't use hanging files. My filing cabinet is a Bisley and has moveable dividers (rather than the older style sliding blocking plate), but to give extra flexibility I use chamois pads (sold for car window de-misting!) to keep the folders upright. So I pack or remove as many of these pads as I need to as folders come and go. This works fine. I use manilla tabbed folders as supplied by the David Allen Company Partner company in the UK. Sadly, this line in their store appears to have been discontinued. My experience with the green hanging folders is that they carry the disadvantages you mention and also the metal sliders at each end tend to get bent after a while.
 

Botany_Bill

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I use hanging files for my paper ticker system. I can't imagine just using non-hanging folders for this. It would just be a headache trying to keep them from falling when a hanging folder is so useful as-is
I should add that the hanging folders are _all_ I use in my paper Tickler. I use no manila folders.

I just don't understand why I'd bother with trying to manage fall-down folders when I have a perfectly good folder system that stays put. Maybe it's because I don't file many other things anyway, so I have the space. And Ticklers aren't manhandled, so the hangers hold up fine.
 

Sojourner

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Does anyone have experience they can share with doing away with the (usually green) hanging file folders, and using only manila folders in a file cabinet?
I don't use a cabinet, hanging file folders, or plain manila folders. Perhaps I don't store as much as others , but I like to use expanding file folders.

I use an A-Z tabbed style for general reference documents, and a monthly tabbed style as a tickler and for things that need a monthly date reference. I use a set at work and a set at home. The letter sized expanding folders will fit inside a typical file cabinet.

I review and purge them as needed. Anything that needs to be kept long-term, I digitally scan to computer or cloud based storage.

UNT_SMD70430.jpg
 
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