How do you handle your completed

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by Aidonithith, Dec 27, 2018.

  1. Aidonithith

    Aidonithith Registered

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    I'm stuck on what to do with my "completed tasks." This seems like it shouldn't be this tricky, but I don't like deleting forever the items I've checked off. I have this nagging sensation that I should be closing the loop somehow during a weekly review where I relate them back to their respective project outlines. Problem is that the items and the project lists are too long, and I can't seem to find the time to get that loop closed.

    How do you handle your completed tasks? Do you just delete them or do you file them? If so, what mechanisms do you use? I use Evernote for my project outlines and all reference materials but Toodledo for the Next Actions lists where folders in Toodledo match my tags in Evernote.
     
  2. Geeko

    Geeko GTD since 2017

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    I work with a paper system but maybe this could help you, too.
    I archive my old lists and trash them regularly. This keeps me able to view my completed tasks but also makes sure that I stay on top of everything.

    Cheers,
    Tristan
     
  3. mcogilvie

    mcogilvie Registered

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    Things 3 puts completed items in a special area for each project or area they are associated with, and also in a logbook ordered by date. It’s been a long time since I last used Toodledo, but as I recall, it has decent mechanisms for reporting on completed items, organized by folder, tags, or other field. You could try adding that as a part of your weekly review.
     
  4. John Ismyname

    John Ismyname Registered

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    Back in my pen-and-paper dayz, I use to get some intrinsic pleasure from putting a check-mark in the "done box and crossing off the task. It was also a permanent record so i could flip back and see when a specific task was done. In the digital age, before I mark a task as being "complete", I quickly copy the task name and paste it into my digital calendar. Thus, my calendar becomes a journal-record. The big benefit to this is seeing how long a task takes me forces me to do better up-front estimates of how long a task will take.
     
  5. Oogiem

    Oogiem Registered

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    I use Omnifocus and I archive off all the various items usually weekly after my review. I can go back and review them if I need to.
     
  6. bcmyers2112

    bcmyers2112 Registered

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    I use Evernote exclusively for my GTD lists and I've set it up using the suggestions in the GTD Evernote Guide from the David Allen Company. There's no way to link projects and next actions in a way that isn't clunky, so I don't try. When I review my projects including whatever project outlines and other support material I have (most of my projects don't require those things) I find it easy to spot which projects and/or pieces of projects I've completed and which ones require me to "promote" actions (assuming I haven't caught those things during the week, which I generally do).

    I used to think I needed a lot more horsepower from a list manager than I actually do. If you're not finding your setup satisfactory, though, I realize my input may not be of much help.

    I have found that Evernote's quality has degraded to the point where I'm questioning why I'm paying a monthly subscription for a sub-par service. The main thing that's held me back from moving to something else is that there are always more interesting, worthwhile things to do than transfer all of my lists to a new list manager. But with the bugs introduced in each new version of the various Evernote clients I find myself getting pushed closer and closer to the point where I will be ready to commit the time needed to change to a different software product.

    One thing has occurred to me as I write this: I don't think anyone has mentioned Nirvana, which keeps a record of completed actions and (I believe) ties them to projects if they're not one-offs. That's one solution I'm considering only because I've heard good things about how easily it ties next actions to projects. I'm at a point with GTD where I feel like I have enough of a handle on the fundamentals that I wouldn't be using that feature as a crutch... and I like to step out of my comfort zone from time to time.

    I don't know if any of this rambling helps, though. o_O
     
  7. AFG

    AFG Registered

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    I use OneNote.

    Next Action items as recommended by the GTD guide are OneNote pages. It is tempting (but causes some problems) to mix page based Next Action Items with OneNote's "native" TO-DO list tags, multiple per page (which basically makes the page into a project.)

    For Next Action Item pages. I often mark the page as DONE - often in the title. And/or I move them to a nearby section named DONE. I have a DONE section in my 2 GTD notebooks, and also in projects.

    When I have used OneNote's native To-Dos, I mark them done - and when all of the To-Dos in a page are done, as preceding.
     
  8. AFG

    AFG Registered

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    1) I agree - EverNote, OneNote, and pretty much every tool that I have tried have no way to link projects and net actions and allof theother things that need to be linked (log/diary, project support/reference) in a way that isn't clunky.

    2) Nevertheless, I am trying - by writing my own OneNote extensions.

    Making pretty good progress.
     

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