Using GTD to enhance your interactions

hercules

Registered
Hi,
So I'm entertaining the idea of drafting up what my important relations areas of focus lists might look like. This is not supposed to be completely accurate or anything, but meant to make it more natural to have more meaningful interactions with them, to be kind and to point them in the direction of things they might find valuable, and also to help when you feel a conversation or relationship may be 'drying up'.
Thanks.
 

RobertWall

Registered
The ultimate question with such a list is probably the recurring GTD question - "what are the projects / next actions for this area of focus?"

I.e. for each relationship you're trying to maintain, you could brainstorm a list of maintenance actions/projects you can do. "Spouse" has societally-defined maintenance actions (anniversary, Valentine's Day, birthday, etc.). For friends, you might want to define things that you know they like, and review accordingly. So if Jack likes to go get lunch occasionally, intentionally decide to schedule a lunch with Jack at least once every three months.

I would encourage you to *not* have lists that are "not supposed to be completely accurate" to the extent you can avoid it - ambiguity in lists creates distrust of the system. It's one thing to say that the list is so complex it might not be up-to-date at any given time during the week, but it's quite another to create a list with the intent that it's not supposed to reflect reality. :)
 

2097

Registered
GTD helps you give the other person your undivided attention. It helps you put a bookmark in your work and just listen.
 
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