A question on contexts that don't just occur by themselves, such as certain errands.

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by Lagerbaer, Nov 19, 2018.

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  1. ellobogrande

    ellobogrande Registered

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    I prefer as few contexts as possible. Here is how I would handle something like this.

    I would first put the reminder on my @Errands list. During my weekly review I would notice that this particular task isn't getting done and is not likely to get done unless I make a deliberate effort to take the watch to the shop. I would then plan a trip to the watch store and put it on my calendar as an appointment. I would also set up timed reminders to put the watch in my pocket or briefcase before I left for work (assuming I wanted to do the errand on my lunch break).

    The best solution, of course, is whatever works best for you.
     
  2. mcogilvie

    mcogilvie Registered

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    I don’t set aside a specific day either. And that’s ok if it works for us.
     
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  3. bcmyers2112

    bcmyers2112 Registered

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    I understand. In most cases I don't schedule errands. Most of the time it's as simple as adding something to my errands list and doing it when I can. But sometimes that's not enough.

    For example, I recently bought the wrong kind of light bulbs and need to return them. I added the action to my @Errands list, but I also put the lightbulbs in my car. That way whenever I'm out and about and in a position to go to that store, I have everything I need.

    I also need to take a gas-powered electricity generator to the repair shop. It's heavy and requires two people to lift it, and my wife can't help me right now due to an injury. So I've scheduled time with a friend to help me load the generator into the car, and also scheduled time to drop it off at the repair shop.

    The former example is simply a variation of the "put it in front of the door" trick DA mentions in the book. The latter example uses scheduling for an errand that requires some preparation and coordination with someone. It's as simple as combining the different tools and tricks available to me as needed to get something done.
     
  4. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

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    I don't do @errands on a specific day but when I need to do them. If I'm doing errands I try to do as much as possible and I plan the optimal route.
    If I want the watch to be repaired because I use it - I include the watch store in my errands route. If I don't use the watch I give it away. I don't see any reason to think about the broken watch that I don't need.
     
  5. Lagerbaer

    Lagerbaer Registered

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    I think checking errands in a regular review is a good solution. It's not that I don't care at all about the watch, but it's never a pressing issue.

    I understand that for some people, errands are this big trip once a month to the next city, during which they then have a million things to do. For me, I either pop out during work (Downtown Vancouver), or stop somewhere on my bike commute home. I think that's why it's important to really think hard about appropriate contexts. At the end of the day, they need to present you with stuff you can actually do in that context, and also help you to plan out steps that need doing.
     
  6. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

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    So maybe THE solution is to have two Next Actions lists: @DailyErrands and @WeeklyErrands.
     

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