Advise Needed - David Allen 2 days seminar recordings

Tem

Registered
Dear Fellows

I just finished the GTD book and plan for full implementation of GTD. I also subscribed for the GTD connect and started to get oriented in it with some seminars.

is there anything offered in GTD connect similar to "David Allen's complete two-day seminar. 10 MP3s." that appears in the GTD store on the GTD public website? have any of you bought this seminar before? and in what way does it differs from reading the GTD book?.

Should I go after listening to take this 2-day full seminar (9 hrs recording only) and 2 days of work...or it is enough for reading the book and get a clear understanding of the system and refer to the book while implantation (and using the installation guide in the GTD connect).


Thank You for your advice
Tem
 

mcogilvie

Registered
David Allen is an engaging speaker, and the recording of a two-day seminar has a lot of value. I still listen to it every so often. There is great consistency in David Allen’s explanations of GTD across all media, but sometimes the emphasis is instructional (“here’s how to set up your lists”), sometimes performative (“make a list of things on your mind”), sometimes philosophical (“mind like water”) and sometimes motivational (“most of what I teach you already know how to do”). The seminar format blends these together, aiming to begin a transformational process. GTD is easy to understand, but can be challenging to implement and sustain, so many people find value in reinforcement, and in tips and tricks. GTD connect provides those. I don’t think there is a single best answer to your questions, because people are all different.
 

Tem

Registered
Thank you so much @mcogilvie for your comprehensive reply and well put together thoughts. it makes perfect sense and I agree.

How long have you been on GTD if I may ask? and what tools yous use by the way, that you find good for you? for list manager, project reference, and general reference. I know of course that it differs from a person to another. I am a Mac user and trying to explore all the options, and focus more on the methodology, not the tools.
 

mcogilvie

Registered
How long have you been on GTD if I may ask? and what tools yous use by the way, that you find good for you? for list manager, project reference, and general reference. I know of course that it differs from a person to another. I am a Mac user and trying to explore all the options, and focus more on the methodology, not the tools.
It’s been over 20 years with GTD for me. I use Things 3 for lists, Bear for project support, and Apple Notes and Keep It for general reference. They are all good tools, but not perfect. You are correct that in the end, the tools don’t matter so much.
 
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TesTeq

Registered
Dear Fellows

I just finished the GTD book and plan for full implementation of GTD. I also subscribed for the GTD connect and started to get oriented in it with some seminars.

is there anything offered in GTD connect similar to "David Allen's complete two-day seminar. 10 MP3s." that appears in the GTD store on the GTD public website? have any of you bought this seminar before? and in what way does it differs from reading the GTD book?.

Should I go after listening to take this 2-day full seminar (9 hrs recording only) and 2 days of work...or it is enough for reading the book and get a clear understanding of the system and refer to the book while implantation (and using the installation guide in the GTD connect).


Thank You for your advice
Tem
For me the difference between reading the GTD book and listening to @DavidAllen recorded seminar is like difference between reading Bob Dylan's or Paul Simon's lyrics and listening to the recordings of their live performances. And of course nothing beats being in a seminar or concert in person.
 

John Forrister

GTD Connect
Staff member
Hi Tem, good question. My opinion is that the book is the most complete presentation of GTD. The recording of the two-day seminar is excellent. It's engaging and inspiring. It does not cover any concepts beyond what's in the book. One thing to note about that recording is that it was done before David made some terminology changes in 2014-2015. The methodology is the same, but a few words are different.

OLD ............................. NEW
five phases five steps
collect capture
process clarify
organize still organize, no change
review reflect
do engage

In the Horizons of Focus...
runway ground
10,000 feet level 1
20,000 feet level 2
30,000 feet level 3
40,000 feet level 4
50,000 feet level 5

In GTD Connect you can find content on every aspect of GTD.
 

DavidAllen

GTD Connect
David Allen is an engaging speaker, and the recording of a two-day seminar has a lot of value. I still listen to it every so often. There is great consistency in David Allen’s explanations of GTD across all media, but sometimes the emphasis is instructional (“here’s how to set up your lists”), sometimes performative (“make a list of things on your mind”), sometimes philosophical (“mind like water”) and sometimes motivational (“most of what I teach you already know how to do”). The seminar format blends these together, aiming to begin a transformational process. GTD is easy to understand, but can be challenging to implement and sustain, so many people find value in reinforcement, and in tips and tricks. GTD connect provides those. I don’t think there is a single best answer to your questions, because people are all different.
Wow, well said. couldn't have done that better myself.
 

Graeme Thom

Registered
My opinion is that the book is the most complete presentation of GTD.
I've found the "audiobook" version of the GTD book (narrated by David) to be fantastic - and it offers the best of both worlds because you get the content of the actual book in audio form. I often go over certain sections again and again (especially on long walks with the dog) and glean new information and insights and tips each time - especially Part 1 (intro/background/overview) and Part 2 (granular detail and step-by-step "coaching") - especially re: "clarify", "organize", "setting up the right buckets", "contexts", "next actions" and "projects" - as well as "project support material" and "incubate/someday/maybe" lists. This repetition is helping me a lot - not only when I sit down to clarify - but these days I often get other random "a ha" moments (when doing something else) and I'll stop and think "oh that's how it works" ... so all the pieces are starting to fall into place.

I've also gone through numerous YouTube videos and while there is similar content in each, there are also noticeable differences (including, if you look carefully, the background presentation slide images). The various video formats include "in-person" coaching, Q&A, TED talk style, and other interviews - each valuable in its own way.

The GTD Connect archives (webinars, audios, transcripts) and the GTD Podcast (often extracted from the Connect archives) are also great. And I also found the "2 minute tips for turbulent times" to be really easy to "digest" and very thought provoking.
 
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Oogiem

Registered
it offers the best of both worlds because you get the content of the actual book in audio form.
Only if you are a person who likes and retains information via sound. I've never enjoyed listening to books and even have a hard time listening to podcasts I want to listen to. I usually read the transcripts instead. I would find it impossible to learn GTD from listening to someone talk about it.
 

Graeme Thom

Registered
Good point @Oogiem! Yes, everyone is different and learns in different ways. I think various media in combination can help too - e.g. reading/listening/watching/doing (kinesthetic) etc. Sometimes I might read something and not quite "get" the concept first time, but later when I "listen" to it explained or when someone "talks" through an example I often get the "oh now I understand" feeling. I also learn well from text and looking at the written examples of lists and workflow chart which provides a visual framework - I love visual "schematic" diagrams. That said, I also find listening to the audio complementary when doing other things like walking the dog or washing the dishes when I can't physically "read". I just thought that the audiobook would be a good option for the OP given they were considering the MP3 audios and John's comment earlier about the book being the "most complete presentation of GTD" - the audiobook is around 10 hours so likley similar in length to the MP3s and "is" the content of the GTD book - so in that sense it's getting both the audio presentation and book content in one (hence "best of both worlds" in that respect).
 

TesTeq

Registered
Good point @Oogiem! Yes, everyone is different and learns in different ways. I think various media in combination can help too - e.g. reading/listening/watching/doing (kinesthetic) etc. Sometimes I might read something and not quite "get" the concept first time, but later when I "listen" to it explained or when someone "talks" through an example I often get the "oh now I understand" feeling. I also learn well from text and looking at the written examples of lists and workflow chart which provides a visual framework - I love visual "schematic" diagrams. That said, I also find listening to the audio complementary when doing other things like walking the dog or washing the dishes when I can't physically "read". I just thought that the audiobook would be a good option for the OP given they were considering the MP3 audios and John's comment earlier about the book being the "most complete presentation of GTD" - the audiobook is around 10 hours so likley similar in length to the MP3s and "is" the content of the GTD book - so in that sense it's getting both the audio presentation and book content in one (hence "best of both worlds" in that respect).
If you're listener, buy audio version of "Ready for Anything" by @DavidAllen . Thanks to this book I've understood the GTD philosophy that is a foundation of the GTD strategies and tactics described in the GTD book.
 
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