Assumed Affirmations

ryanroars

Registered
Completely agree with David on this brilliant article. When I was in my teens, my father introduced me to Dr. Stephen Covey's 7 Habits book and Habit 2 - Begin with an end in mind has always stuck with me ever since. Reading David's essay brought back good memories of how I implement that Habit and reaffirmed my learnings from the GTD book.
 

Longstreet

Professor of microbiology and infectious diseases
However, I do believe that one can have too much focus on just outcomes. I think studies have shown that if you focus on the process more, then you will get the outcomes you want. Writing manuscripts, books, etc. is an excellent example. Instead of just focusing on the outcome of writing the book, many authors have documented that if they simply schedule times on their calendar every day dedicated to writing and not focusing on the outcome, they produce their book - AND enjoy the process of writing, which they love. So focus more on process and not as much on "keeping the end in mind".
 

TesTeq

Registered
However, I do believe that one can have too much focus on just outcomes. I think studies have shown that if you focus on the process more, then you will get the outcomes you want. Writing manuscripts, books, etc. is an excellent example. Instead of just focusing on the outcome of writing the book, many authors have documented that if they simply schedule times on their calendar every day dedicated to writing and not focusing on the outcome, they produce their book - AND enjoy the process of writing, which they love. So focus more on process and not as much on "keeping the end in mind".
Maybe we should focus on the outcome if we hate the process. For example a "clean bathroom" outcome versus a "bathroom cleaning" process.
 

Longstreet

Professor of microbiology and infectious diseases
Maybe we should focus on the outcome if we hate the process. For example a "clean bathroom" outcome versus a "bathroom cleaning" process.
LOL! In case of cleaning bathrooms, you may be right! I was thinking of more professional pursuits...
 

ryanroars

Registered
However, I do believe that one can have too much focus on just outcomes. I think studies have shown that if you focus on the process more, then you will get the outcomes you want. Writing manuscripts, books, etc. is an excellent example. Instead of just focusing on the outcome of writing the book, many authors have documented that if they simply schedule times on their calendar every day dedicated to writing and not focusing on the outcome, they produce their book - AND enjoy the process of writing, which they love. So focus more on process and not as much on "keeping the end in mind".
Of course. Doing the activity ("the process") is necessary to getting to the outcome. Sometimes, I tend to forget why I am doing what I'm doing so "having an end in mind" helps me to refocus my actions.

If I understand correctly, when writing out the Outcomes for a project; GTD recommends as defining what "Done" means?

Hope this makes sense. Sorry I'm new to GTD and slowly getting the hang of it. :)
 

Longstreet

Professor of microbiology and infectious diseases
Yep -- this is correct. Of course you want to know what done looks like for your projects. I was just using the writing example that many professionals use in their work. And not only writing - this is for lots of other work. Focusing on the process is more pleasurable than always stressing out about outcomes all of the time. If you focus on the process, your outcomes will happen.
 
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