Retirement and GTD

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by TMac, Jan 2, 2019.

  1. TMac

    TMac Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    i retired 3 months ago and have found that my use and success of GTD has been sorely lacking.

    When I was working, I had robust lists with projects and deliverables. I implemented GTD years ago and felt that I was on top of my work. When I would hit overwhelm, I knew I needed to take a deep breath and look at my GTD system. I used task managers to keep it together. Now I believe paper will be my best tool.

    Given my newly retired world, I’ve lost focus on my personal organization. I’ve found that I have been exploring different methodologies to organize my world. At heart, there has to be a use for GTD for someone at this stage of life.

    I would love some thoughts or suggestions on how to recapture the pursuit of “mind like water”. It would be interesting to hear from others who have successfully faced this challenge.
     
  2. bdavidson

    bdavidson Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Gender:
    Male
    Congratulations on reaching this milestone!

    It sounds like you’re struggling to populate a satisfactory Projects list, so perhaps you will benefit most by reviewing your Areas of Focus to see if they are still appropriate for your new season of life. Maybe it will be easy, or maybe you’ll discover that you don’t have a satisfying plan for how to be retired, which could then become a GTD Project to define your higher horizons.
     
    TMac likes this.
  3. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,595
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    83
    GTD with no @work component? It's great! I was maintaining two separate GTD systems according to my rule "nothing personal on systems that I don't own" and now I have half of the "GTD burden"! :cool:
     
  4. Tom_Hagen

    Tom_Hagen Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    I believe it's hard at the beginning to implement so huge change in life. But later you will get used to it. There are lots of things you can accomplish, for example you can watch top 100 films of all time, the same: books, you can develop your hobbies (photography / DIY / ornitology / stamps / ...), learn new skills, languages. If you have family / friends (area of focus) you can spend more time with them, do sth for them (projects in gtd), you can focus on your health. Enjoy you life - that I wish you.
     
    TesTeq likes this.
  5. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,595
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My experience seems to be different. All my life I was setting goals and now I prefer a goalless life. Isn't it great to look out the window in the morning and say: "it's a beautiful day so I will walk or run, or windsurf" or "it's raining cats and dogs, so I will read a book or watch an interesting documentary"?
    I prefer to enjoy the life instead of forcing myself to accomplish some artificial goals!
     
    Tom_Hagen likes this.
  6. mcogilvie

    mcogilvie Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2,314
    Likes Received:
    259
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I’m not retired, but I see it on the horizon.My job as a college professor gives me busy semesters where there are many demands on my time, a lot of them not easily controlled. During winter break, which we are now finishing, I have more control and more time to reflect and catch up. I’m not idle, but I am able to devote more sustained time to projects important to me.

    I think this is probably a good way for me to think about retirement. I am fortunate that older friends, now retired, have organized a book group, a regular poker game, and other activities which provide ongoing interaction with good friends. I am cultivating a deep Someday/Maybe list with an emphasis on travel, and I think my higher levels of focus may grow too. As David Allen says, “The value of future planning lies in the changes it causes you to make now.”
     
  7. Oogiem

    Oogiem Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    4,633
    Likes Received:
    424
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Gender:
    Female
    Why not just adapt GTD methods to pursue whatever strikes your fancy? Fully half my GTD system is fun hting, projects, goals and ideas that have nothing to do with runing the farm but are just things I want to do. I basically retired from the ordinary work world 20 years ago to farm but it's notfull time (sometimes only half time as in 12 hours a day ;p) ) but I still can't imagine making it through life with out GTD.
     
  8. Tom_Hagen

    Tom_Hagen Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    So you still have a goal: lead a goalless life. ;)
     
    TesTeq likes this.
  9. drparker48

    drparker48 David Parker

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    64
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Home Page:
    I retired from working for a living five years ago . . .

    At the beginning of this period I did an early GTD Annual Review, which is a big Weekly Review plus a Mindsweep and Horizon Review.

    It was great seeing what I could ditch, and what I couldn't, at least for the time being, as I ran my own company and that would take a while to completely run down.

    I started to add all the things that had sat on my Someday/Maybe lists for ages.

    I just changed my focus. I still do the Weekly Reviews. There are still bills to paid, errands to run etc. But all my planning is now around what I want to do.

    The Annual Reviews are still valuable for setting and resetting my Horizons of Focus.

    I have taken the opportunity to try different GTD apps and without the need to support both work and personal systems, that's become easier.

    I've relied on the GTD approach for nearly twenty years now and it's part of my life.

    Give it time. It took me probably two years to really hone my system to my new world of not working.
     
    TMac likes this.
  10. treelike

    treelike Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Messages:
    274
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    So does that mean that your 30k and 40k lists are empty? Do you still review those levels at appropriate intervals in case something turns up?
     
  11. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,595
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I am a huge fan of Someday/Maybe list and monotasking. So my Someday/Maybe list is long but my 30k list is very short. Currently it is "write and self-publish a next book". I don't believe in grand 5-year visions since my life was always bringing me great surprises. For example once upon a time I called my friend to hire him but he... hired me. :eek:
     
  12. treelike

    treelike Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Messages:
    274
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    "Life is what happens to you when you're busy making other plans"
     
  13. treelike

    treelike Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2005
    Messages:
    274
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    I suggest that you still have "mind like water", it's just that the water is a bit too calm for you at the moment. That, or you're fed up with the scenery and need to move the ship to waters new.

    In other words your organisational system is fine but retirement has meant that you've lost purpose at some level(s). "Humans are purpose driven machines". Therefore your new "job" is to find purpose to replace that which was previously provided by your work. I believe that this can only be achieved by experimentation, trying new things, retrying old things, seeing how they feel and modifying goals in light of what is learned. This process alone can result in a rich and varied Project list, similar to what bdavidson said.
     
    TMac likes this.
  14. ArcCaster

    ArcCaster Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    18
    TesTeq, you strike a chord! I have been doing the same thing -- start by checking the weather, then move and observe and react to the present and to my environment -- so I am spending more time in 'reaction mode', taking care of things and taking advantage of opportunities and spending time with people that I used to skip because they did not lead to a goal.
     
  15. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,595
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Yes! And it doesn't mean totally goalless life. For example currently I am working on my new book. But first I check the weather and I write only when it is unpleasant. I can count on the weather since Warsaw is not a tropical island. ;)
     
  16. Tom_Hagen

    Tom_Hagen Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Move to Silesia (where I live). We currently have sun, heat, green trees and blooming flowers ;)
     
    Castanea_d. and TesTeq like this.
  17. Castanea_d.

    Castanea_d. Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2017
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    23
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Organist/Choirmaster
    Location:
    Iowa
    Home Page:
    I am reading this with interest because retirement is in the fairly near future. I have some ideas as to what I hope to do, but I know that it will be different. At this stage (still working), the idea of "Time Available" takes a new meaning beyond "I have twenty minutes before that meeting." Now it sometimes applies to larger projects - I must consider whether the constraints on my remaining time mean that I shouldn't start something. Or perhaps I should, with a big part of the plan being how I can pass it on to others in a few months. It is all very interesting.
     
  18. Tom_Hagen

    Tom_Hagen Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2018
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    I think GTD also supports retirement part of life. Even if you want to be like TesTeq and to look out the window in the morning and check if some beautiful girl is passing by ;) and to lead goalless life GTD still would be "in use" as system of options / choices. You can "order" something from this menu or don't. You can be calm about things not doing right now and also you can be calm about every posibilities because they are in your system and waiting for you looking at you with their sweet eyes.
     
  19. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2003
    Messages:
    4,595
    Likes Received:
    395
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I had the luxury to prepare for this mindset in the pre-retirement time. For example in summer I was routinely shortening my work hours when the wind was appropriate for windsurfing. Quick wind assessment via weather portals at 2 pm and... at 3 pm I was often windsurfing... ;)
    BUT I had to know what I was NOT doing when I was windsurfing!
     
    Tom_Hagen likes this.

Share This Page