Baroque Music Snippet on GTD Fast CD??

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by Anonymous, Nov 17, 2004.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    At one point in this CD set, DA talks about using music to inspire him to get in the mood to do his weekly review. He then powers up a snippet a baroque music from his computer.

    Does anyone recognize that piece of music? Thanks!

    Kevin
     
  2. eez

    eez Registered

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  3. spectecGTD

    spectecGTD Guest

    I also believe it is Bach's Brandenburg Concerto # 3.

    If you like this tempo & style, you might also want to check out Vivaldi's "The Four Seasons". especially the Spring (E Major) and Autumn (F Major).
     
  4. Ray2

    Ray2 Guest

     
  5. Constant

    Constant Guest

    I also loved that snippet of music. I don't think it's from Brandenburg Concerto #3 either. Hate to make extra work for Davidco but wonder if they would have the name of piece and composer.

    No worries either way. I was thinking of playing it for my local music guru to see if he can identify it. If I get the name will post it for everyone interested.
     
  6. jerendeb

    jerendeb Registered

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    Baroque Music

    Concertos for Recorder - Telemann & Vivaldi
     
  7. Busydave

    Busydave Registered

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    Just wondering – does anyone know if there are any CD compilations of baroque music chosen specifically for their thinking aid qualities?

    I have several collections of Bach concertos (concerti?) but each concerto consists of a fast, a slow, and another fast movement. The tempo of the slow movements does not meet the sixty beats per minute requirement. Have there been any collections of just fast movements published?

    (I know this is sacrilege to music lovers, but I will still listen to the complete compositions another time, honest!).

    Dave
     
  8. spectecGTD

    spectecGTD Guest

    This doesn't exactly answer your question, but a good place to look for classical cd's is the stores who resell and/or consign cd's, videos, games, etc. if there are any near you.

    There are a couple near my office and I drop in from time-to-time to see what they have in the classical selections. These places are popular with the young people looking for rap, rock, and associated music, so they usually price the classical cd's (if they even accept them) dirt cheap.
     
  9. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

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    60 BPM requirement?

    What is this sixty beats per minute requirement?
     
  10. Busydave

    Busydave Registered

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    Hi Tes

    It’s the beats-per-minute required to get the brain up to optimal revs. David has a segment about it on GTD Fast – I also came across it at a speed-reading class. It seems to cause a “bright and breezy” frame of mind where thinking and creativity are easier. I find it works.

    I will just have to learn how to get the program function on my CD player to work so that I can skip the slow tracks.

    Dave
     
  11. andersons

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    playlists are the answer

    Digital format and playlists are the way to go! I have "Energizing" and "Relaxing" playlists.

    My days of programming CD tracks are over.

    I'm a musician, but I see no sacrilege. A human being wrote the music; human beings recorded it; you're the human being who bought the recording, and you have a right to listen to it any way you please. :)

    Something is not right here. Fast movements of Bach concertos are supposed to have a tempo of sixty beats per minute?? And the slow movements are supposed to be have tempos with even fewer beats per minute?? This is not the case. And sixty beats per minute is specifically supposed to increase creativity?
     
  12. flexiblefine

    flexiblefine Registered

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    No, harpsichord...

    I think the original poster was asking about the music David uses as his example of "Weekly Review" music, not the music used as fillers and wrappers in parts of the program.

    David's music definitely had harpsichord in it, but I don't have a clue what piece of music that is.

    Constant, did you have any luck getting your guru to identify it?
     
  13. Busydave

    Busydave Registered

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    Well to be more precise, I think the requirement is tempos over 60 beats per minute – that’s the only reason GTD Fast features baroque music. I’m fairly sure David gives a short explanation of the effect on the brain. The guy who gave the speed-reading course I attended explained it in those terms also.

    Dave
     
  14. andersons

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    Given what is known about music and what it known about the brain, how would beats per minute have an effect on thinking or creativity? The claim is ridiculous.

    All music has a tempo, a certain number of beats per minute, and many songs, from any genre you'd hear on the radio -- pop, rap, R&B, oldies -- have a tempo faster than 60 beats per minute. And in the art music genre, tempos faster than 60 bpm are hardly unique to the Baroque era.

    Besides, a song will sound more or less lively depending on how many notes are played per beat and how frequently the chords change ("harmonic rhythm"). A song with notes played 4 to a beat (sixteenth notes) is going to sound a lot faster than a song with 2 beats per note (half notes). The former could sound fairly stimulating, while the latter would help put you to sleep.

    I'm sorry to say, but David and the speed-reading guru are both wrong about this. The claim is inconsistent with knowledge of music and knowledge of the brain. I think that when people are selling information, they should be held to a high standard for its validity. This sounds like hype.

    The main effect is to make a hard or boring task more palatable by adding music. That can definitely be useful. Or to energize you ("increase arousal") when you're tired. Both of those effects are well supported. But if motivation and energy for the task are already high, music won't make a difference for the task itself and may actually distract from the focus the task requires.
     
  15. Busydave

    Busydave Registered

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  16. Constant

    Constant Guest

    flexiblefine, I'm still working on it. It's a project!

    Back to the parts of the general discussion on music at 60 beats, I read (can't recall source) that this approximates our heartbeat and that the steady pace of Baroque music helps us get into a groove that optimises learning or doing work that needs focussed thought.

    I know Superlearning technique even uses breathing at a steady pace where you break up data to be learned into four second invervals then voice record them to a tape recorder. Following their method you breathe in for four seconds, hold your breath as you listen to a four second data bite, then breath out for four seconds. Something like that. I'm sure their (Superlearning) website explains the whole process much better. The rythmic breathing and background barogue largos put you into the perfect brain state receptive to learning. Or something like that. Hope my source on this wasn't the National Enquirer.
     
  17. kewms

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    60 beats per minute is actually a pretty slow heart rate, on the order of a very fit person's resting heart rate. It seems to me more likely to be typical of sleep than of focused concentration. 60 beats per minute is also a very slow musical tempo, much slower than most of the Baroque music in my collection.

    While rhythmic breathing is common in many meditation practices, four second breaths strike me as more likely to induce oxygen deprivation than learning. Try it and see how long you can keep it up. And I'll bet doing it takes your heart rate significantly above 60 beats per minute, too.

    So yeah, I'm a bit skeptical.

    Katherine
     
  18. MikeC

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    Unless you are Lance Armstrong with a heart rate of 35 BPM. I bet he sleeps with socks on. But he probably gets alot done!
     
  19. Constant

    Constant Guest

    Katherine, I should clarify on info from my previous post. The four second Superlearning technique is not four second breaths, rather 3 consecutive four second breathing actions(so really, 4x3=12 second breaths):
    1. Inhale for four seconds
    2.Hold breath for four seconds and while doing so listen to your taped voice of information you are trying to learn
    3.Exhale for four seconds

    Repeat above for an individual learning session of approx. 20 minutes. Collect Nobel Prize.
    Hope that clarifies.

    You need to make a tape using the second hand of your watch or listening to the clicks of a music metronome set at 60 bpm to create the 4 blank seconds of tape, followed by 4 seconds of your voice recorded info(info like key points from a text you're studying for ex.), followed by 4 blank seconds and so on.

    I bet making the tape is 80% of the learning experience.

    This stuff comes out of the Superlearning Book (one author, Sheila Ostrander)
    Probably easy to find in a library.

    Also, to clarify on 60 bpm Baroque music - should have emphasized the slower "largo" sections of Baroque pieces are what the fuss is about in this, not the piece in it's entirety.

    Again with disclaimer that there is probably a lot more on this stuff than the above. Agreed on skepticism. For me, it's just intellectual curiousity. Already I'm over my head.
     
  20. kewms

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    Yes. I understood that. That's artifically fast breathing for me. YMMV.

    I'll bet you're right. 10% more is self-motivation: you are especially diligent because you don't want to feel the effort of making the tape was wasted.

    Katherine
     

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