Need Guidance with GTD. Can't seem to make it work

Quang123

Registered
I have been doing GTD for 3 years and I can't seem to make it flow for me. Once I find a new software and implement into that, my list eventually get too big and I just avoid it. I have changed multiple different software platforms but still can't get it to where I can really make it useful for juggling the long list of todos that I need to manage. I must be missing something. Maybe I need a coach. Any ideas?
 

Gardener

Registered
Could you describe your system a little? For example, you say "long list of todos", but don't mention projects, contexts, or next actions. And do you use Someday/Maybe to reduce the total number of projects?
 

Logan

Registered
Dear Quang123,

based on what I understood from your post here are my 50 cents:

Tools
I am really sorry, but it is not about the tool. Just use something that you easily have access to where you are. The main thing for me was the ability to link projects to next actions. But that is a very personal preference.
Based on what you wrote and what I read between the lines this seems not to be your problem. Don‘t focus on the tool.

Avoiding Your Lists
Imagine you could do anything anywhere. Therefore you would need just one context. Then you put in anything you can think of and commit yourself to doing on that list. How long would that list be? Let it have 300 next actions. How long would it take you to read the whole list and then figure out what is the most important next action you should be start working on? I would start reading the list and when I‘m at e.g. action 50 would not know what action 1 was. Conclusion: You have to reduce that long list of committments.

How does it feel when you do your weekly review and look at your list? Within let’s say one week you could have done some next actions. The rest of your next actions have not been touched. How does that feel? If you do the weekly review (if not then leave GTD, because you will fail), then start putting only so much on your next action list you think you really have time and energy to do. Put the rest on someday/maybe. In the weekly review after your current one you take the action to look at your maybe/someday list and take what‘s feasible from there and put it to your next action list that the full list of next actions does not overwhelm you. Conclusion: Because you do your weekly review, you know items of your maybe/someday list have a chance of being done. But you don‘t have to commit to all of them at once. Overcommitting (if that term exists) creates overwhelm and leads to avoidance.
 

Quang123

Registered
Could you describe your system a little? For example, you say "long list of todos", but don't mention projects, contexts, or next actions. And do you use Someday/Maybe to reduce the total number of projects?
I have used omniofocus, todoist, wunderlist, apple reminders before and am currently using Microsoft Todo. I have projects, contexted next actions set up and I do use someday maybe as well to push things that are not really active todo. regardless, my context todo get rather large and it becomes almost overwhelmed by them. Maybe I didn't flush out my actions throughly enough.
 

Quang123

Registered
Dear Quang123,

based on what I understood from your post here are my 50 cents:

Tools
I am really sorry, but it is not about the tool. Just use something that you easily have access to where you are. The main thing for me was the ability to link projects to next actions. But that is a very personal preference.
Based on what you wrote and what I read between the lines this seems not to be your problem. Don‘t focus on the tool.

Avoiding Your Lists
Imagine you could do anything anywhere. Therefore you would need just one context. Then you put in anything you can think of and commit yourself to doing on that list. How long would that list be? Let it have 300 next actions. How long would it take you to read the whole list and then figure out what is the most important next action you should be start working on? I would start reading the list and when I‘m at e.g. action 50 would not know what action 1 was. Conclusion: You have to reduce that long list of committments.

How does it feel when you do your weekly review and look at your list? Within let’s say one week you could have done some next actions. The rest of your next actions have not been touched. How does that feel? If you do the weekly review (if not then leave GTD, because you will fail), then start putting only so much on your next action list you think you really have time and energy to do. Put the rest on someday/maybe. In the weekly review after your current one you take the action to look at your maybe/someday list and take what‘s feasible from there and put it to your next action list that the full list of next actions does not overwhelm you. Conclusion: Because you do your weekly review, you know items of your maybe/someday list have a chance of being done. But you don‘t have to commit to all of them at once. Overcommitting (if that term exists) creates overwhelm and leads to avoidance.

That is a good point. I have not tried that approach. So if I do the weekly review, I can just put those next actions that I have energy and time to possibly do and put all others actions that are not likely to be done within that week either to someday maybe or my calendar. Ok. that makes sense. Just need to make the weekly review a consistent touch stone to refresh and reset.

I do find that I get anxious when I empty everything into my GTD system. It is like I giving up something. I feel like I am stuck in a rigid system that does not allow me to use my intuition to be negotiable with my time. I must have misunderstood something about GTD. Please advise.
 

GTDengineer

Registered
GTD project and next actions lists are essentially just reminders of the commitments you have made. If anything feels ridgid, it’s probably a sign that you have overcommitted yourself to an impossible number of projects and actions.

The strategy you should employ is to delegate or defer a portion of your commitments (projects and/or next actions.)

Your time should remain completely under your intuitive control. You choose when to look at your lists, and when to do something spontaneously.
 
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Quang123

Registered
GTD project and next actions lists are essentially just reminders of the commitments you have made. If anything feels ridgid, it’s probably a sign that you have overcommitted yourself to an impossible number of projects and actions.

The strategy you should employ is to delegate or defer a portion of your commitments (projects and/or next actions.)

Your time should remain completely under your intuitive control. You choose when to look at your lists, and when to do something spontaneously.
Yes, I think I overcommit myself to too much. I have more todo's then I have time to complete them. Will have to learn to defer or delegate. I have noticed when I put everything on my GTD system, I feel like I am being chained to my todo list and it makes me disconnected from everything which causes me to feel anxious. I feel like I am missing something big. But I guess I haven't done my weekly review well enough or have not flushed out my Projects action steps out well enough. Perhaps that is it.
 
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Jared Caron

Healthcare Quality & Safety pro; GTD enthusiast
I have been doing GTD for 3 years and I can't seem to make it flow for me. Once I find a new software and implement into that, my list eventually get too big and I just avoid it. I have changed multiple different software platforms but still can't get it to where I can really make it useful for juggling the long list of todos that I need to manage. I must be missing something. Maybe I need a coach. Any ideas?

After reading this thread, I have a couple of thoughts.

It might feel like 3 years is a long time, but consider that you are still a beginner with the GTD methodology. Its a path of mastery, so try to be patient with yourself as you keep learning how to implement GTD in your world.

Some practical thoughts:

Slow down, especially in the first 3 phases (capture, clarify, organize). Most of us come upon GTD because we already have a lot to do and are motivated to do more. Hence I think we envision everything in GTD happening super fast (after all, the book is titled Getting things done...).

So we capture fast, we clarify fast, we organize fast... and then we find ourselves repelled by our lists because they are too long or irrelevant or unclear. Realize that GTD is as much a way of thinking about your work as a way of doing or organizing your work. Learning a new way of thinking takes time. Give yourself permission to slow down.

Slowing down while capturing means really emptying your head on a topic, project, or task, before tossing that note in the inbox. Capturing isn't about speed, it's about completeness.

Slowing down while clarifying means deliberately walking through the questions in the flowchart and allowing yourself to think it all the way through before deciding what, if any, action is needed. After years, I still keep a laminated copy of the flowchart at the bottom of my inbox for reference during clarifying, because it helps me slow down.

Slowing down while organizing means really considering where the best place to park your reminders will be. this is often part of clarifying, so slowing down there helps you with this step also. Many things are not obvious - for example, if you need information from someone, are you going to call them, email them, or text them? The best answer for that is going to depend on the situation, your own preferences, and your knowledge of the other persons communication style. If you jump straight to "call Jim" but you aren't fully comfortable with that mode of communication (either in general, or with Jim, or about the topic...) you will resist calling Jim and it will just hang out on your list and bother you. Or maybe you realize after that you actually need more information before you can call Jim, or maybe you need to spend a few minutes and jot down an outline of what to say, so the call is not actually the next action. Slowing down in this phase is so critical. Clarifying and organizing is not about speed it's about effectiveness.

The more complete your capturing is, the more you will trust your system.

The more precise your decisions in clarifying and organizing are, the smoother it will be to review and engage with your work. So really try to slow way down in those early phases.


Consider how you are using your calendar. Remember that your calendar is actually a next actions list - just one that's tied to dates and times. I struggled for a long time putting things on next action lists that really belonged in my calendar, because they required a certain amount of time to complete. This is especially true if you work in a high-meeting environment. Theres a misconception that David discourages scheduling actions on the calendar. As long as that decision is intentionally made in the clarifying process, its totally consistent with GTD. Some frequent posters on the forum are big advocates of time-blocking, like @Longstreet.

A few things to consider with your calendar:
1. Do you have enough clarifying time daily? - most people need at least 1 hour to 90 minutes (cumulatively) of free space each workday in order to process inputs effectively
2. What kinds of things do you need to be scheduling? given the pace of my workday, generally I consider scheduling any task that requires more than 30 minutes of uninterrupted time, or a special degree of mental focus. If i have to cancel these "self-appointments", they move to my next action lists as a "schedule xx hours for [task]", rather than simply getting deleted.

Optimizing your use of calendar can offload some key things from your next action lists.

Hope it helps :)
 

Longstreet

Professor of microbiology and infectious diseases
After reading this thread, I have a couple of thoughts.

It might feel like 3 years is a long time, but consider that you are still a beginner with the GTD methodology. Its a path of mastery, so try to be patient with yourself as you keep learning how to implement GTD in your world.

Some practical thoughts:

Slow down, especially in the first 3 phases (capture, clarify, organize). Most of us come upon GTD because we already have a lot to do and are motivated to do more. Hence I think we envision everything in GTD happening super fast (after all, the book is titled Getting things done...).

So we capture fast, we clarify fast, we organize fast... and then we find ourselves repelled by our lists because they are too long or irrelevant or unclear. Realize that GTD is as much a way of thinking about your work as a way of doing or organizing your work. Learning a new way of thinking takes time. Give yourself permission to slow down.

Slowing down while capturing means really emptying your head on a topic, project, or task, before tossing that note in the inbox. Capturing isn't about speed, it's about completeness.

Slowing down while clarifying means deliberately walking through the questions in the flowchart and allowing yourself to think it all the way through before deciding what, if any, action is needed. After years, I still keep a laminated copy of the flowchart at the bottom of my inbox for reference during clarifying, because it helps me slow down.

Slowing down while organizing means really considering where the best place to park your reminders will be. this is often part of clarifying, so slowing down there helps you with this step also. Many things are not obvious - for example, if you need information from someone, are you going to call them, email them, or text them? The best answer for that is going to depend on the situation, your own preferences, and your knowledge of the other persons communication style. If you jump straight to "call Jim" but you aren't fully comfortable with that mode of communication (either in general, or with Jim, or about the topic...) you will resist calling Jim and it will just hang out on your list and bother you. Or maybe you realize after that you actually need more information before you can call Jim, or maybe you need to spend a few minutes and jot down an outline of what to say, so the call is not actually the next action. Slowing down in this phase is so critical. Clarifying and organizing is not about speed it's about effectiveness.

The more complete your capturing is, the more you will trust your system.

The more precise your decisions in clarifying and organizing are, the smoother it will be to review and engage with your work. So really try to slow way down in those early phases.


Consider how you are using your calendar. Remember that your calendar is actually a next actions list - just one that's tied to dates and times. I struggled for a long time putting things on next action lists that really belonged in my calendar, because they required a certain amount of time to complete. This is especially true if you work in a high-meeting environment. Theres a misconception that David discourages scheduling actions on the calendar. As long as that decision is intentionally made in the clarifying process, its totally consistent with GTD. Some frequent posters on the forum are big advocates of time-blocking, like @Longstreet.

A few things to consider with your calendar:
1. Do you have enough clarifying time daily? - most people need at least 1 hour to 90 minutes (cumulatively) of free space each workday in order to process inputs effectively
2. What kinds of things do you need to be scheduling? given the pace of my workday, generally I consider scheduling any task that requires more than 30 minutes of uninterrupted time, or a special degree of mental focus. If i have to cancel these "self-appointments", they move to my next action lists as a "schedule xx hours for [task]", rather than simply getting deleted.

Optimizing your use of calendar can offload some key things from your next action lists.

Hope it helps :)
Bravo -- great response!
 

Gardener

Registered
I have used omniofocus, todoist, wunderlist, apple reminders before and am currently using Microsoft Todo. I have projects, contexted next actions set up and I do use someday maybe as well to push things that are not really active todo. regardless, my context todo get rather large and it becomes almost overwhelmed by them. Maybe I didn't flush out my actions throughly enough.

A side question: You mention a context "todo". But everything is stuff to do. It sounds like you may not be using contexts as GTD intends?

More generally: It sounds like you're putting everything you think you might need to do in your main GTD lists, the ones that you would be scanning every day, and trying to cope with the length of the resulting lists.

I would suggest that you instead decide the list length that you can tolerate--five projects? Twenty? Ninety?--and put everything else into Someday/Maybe.

Also, while many projects don't actually have dependencies, you're unlikely to do certain proects at the same time as other projects. For example, I could have projects for the fall garden that say:

- Plant garlic
- Put the asparagus to bed for winter
- Prep the back of rows 2 and 3 for perennials.
- Clear the onion bed.
- Prep the front of row 4 for peas.

and dozens of others. (Yeah, I'm not bothering with outcome-based project titles for this example.)

But I'm not going to get more than two garden projects done per week. I'm just not. So everything but one or two goes into a Someday/Maybe list called "Garden Thoughts". When I finish a project, I can go read that list for the next one.

Similar for the novel I'm writing. I have a list of "Scenes I need", with a couple of dozen things in it. But that's Someday/Maybe; the only thing that would be in my main GTD lists would be "Write a scene". That gives me the flexibility to go look at Scenes I Need to see what I'm in the mood to write, but it keeps Scenes I Need from cluttering up my lists.

There's an ocean of things you could do. For your GTD lists, take an eyedropper and take out just a few drops.
 

Logan

Registered
I do find that I get anxious when I empty everything into my GTD system. It is like I giving up something. I feel like I am stuck in a rigid system that does not allow me to use my intuition to be negotiable with my time. I must have misunderstood something about GTD. Please advise.

What you wish for happens in my opinion in the weekly review. You decide what to do and where to put focus on. When you start to act, you have the freedom to choose from your next action list. I can relate a little to what you write. But for me it‘s more the acceleration of work. I feel I can do much more and my system allows me to do that, but I wonder whether at some time I stumble upon my own feet. Then I ask myself what is the alternative? GTD is nevertheless the best option for me.

On the other hand: Why not put recreational activities into your system? At the end you should strive for balance. If you just put into your system what you have to do (like work related stuff) and not e.g. chat with friends, then it may feel like you described.
 

ivanjay205

Registered
There is a lot of great advice here but I just want to point you to FacileThings. I have tried lots and lots of tools and I have always come back to FacileThings. It really keeps you honest to the GTD system as it is as pure to the framework as I have found. I love it and find it really keeps me on check with the system.
 

Oogiem

Registered
Once I find a new software and implement into that, my list eventually get too big and I just avoid it. I have changed multiple different software platforms but still can't get it to where I can really make it useful for juggling the long list of todos that I need to manage. I must be missing something.
No software will fix an recurring systemic problem. All the SW will do is allow you to handle your lsits in a more efficient manner but you still hve to curate what is on your lists.

As others have mentiones you must first CAPTURE the things that you need to do, the CLARIFY what they mean. Are they full blown projects? Are they next actions? Where can I do them? What are the necessary tools? Do I have time and energy now to add this to my list of tasks? The answers will determine where and what you do with what you have noted. That's the CLARIFY step.

So here is an example from my own system:

I look at the weather and notice that in 2 days it's predicted that we will have lows of 3°F and a high of 15°F. I know that all the sheep water tanks will freezea and I need to install the heaters. So I put a note into my inbox "Sheep water tank heaters" and move on. I don't have time to deal with it right now, I'm in the middle of something else. Later that day or the next day I process my inbox and get to the note about the sheep water tank heaters. I know that installing them for the winter will take several steps. So I create a project called Sheep Water tank Heaters Installed in my list management tool. (I use Omnifocus but it could eb any tool or even paper) Now I need tofigure out what the next action is. Well in this case I need to count how many water heaters we need. That is a task that has to be done when I am outside and I don't need any help to do it so I create an Action under the project to "Count number of 2020 water tanks that need heaters." and the context is Outside by Myself. Now I also know that we have some heaters stored in the red barn so since I am working on the project I also add an action "Get water heaters from Red Barn" and the context is Red Barn. Other actions I know I have to do include locating enough extension cords, checking to see all the heaters work perhaps I need to purchase some heaters or I may need toadd a metal cage if the tabks are plastic not metal, or I might even have to add or purchase more water tanks when I discover that some of the tanks have holes that cannot be repaired. I personally like to fill out as much of a project as I can and in many cases I can do most of the project planning at once but all that really matters is that I have a project and at least one action.
I work through the actions, counting tanks, getting the water heaters out, finding and installing extension cords and so on and discover that I need to buy some more tanks and some heaters. As I am working I add the apropriate actions to my lists in the contex tin which I can do them.

While I am workign on this project I also rememebr that i want to seed Sanfoin into the lower pasture. I make that note and add it to my ibpx when I am next in the house. When I process this note I realize that because we had no fall rains and it's now too cold that this will have tobe delayed until next spring. So I just put that idea "Spread Sanfoin seed in lower pasture" into my Farm Projecs to Do Someday/Maybe list. I know it will eventually become a project with actions like buy Sainfoin seed, locate a no till drill to rent and so on but for now all I need to do is capture it for later. When I do my weekly review I have things set so that the only projects in my Omnofocus system are ones I can do in this 3 month period. So I never see it/ I reset those project sd review ALL my someday/maybe lsits quarterly. I'll look at the Farm projects to Do list again in December at the Solstice and sicne it's a spring projectthat can be done in March or April depending on the weather I'll notice it then and move the project about the sainfoin from my S/M lists into my Omnifocus system and start working on it.

Weekly reviews are my time to compare what's on my lsits, with what I got done last week and what I have planned fo rnext week and how it all fits into what I have on my 12 week year quarterly plan for getting major projects done.

I like long lists and I typically have several hundred active projects. Other epeople will limit their active projects toonly those they reasonably expect to work on in that week. Either way is fine but from you issues I bet you are more on the need shorter lists end of the spectrum than I am.


The key is you CAN'T do everythign on your lsits and you need to curate or triage your projects and tasks. My Someday/Maybe lsits are hige, over 1000 items on them and probably closer to 2000 but that's ok I am only working on hwat I have decided, by reviewing, what is most important now and in this season.
 

Oogiem

Registered
I do find that I get anxious when I empty everything into my GTD system. It is like I giving up something. I feel like I am stuck in a rigid system that does not allow me to use my intuition to be negotiable with my time.
Ah but having a full complete GTD system allows you the freedom to choose to not do something. Just because it's on a list doesn't mean Iyou can't change tactics or focus as needed. Up until the 21st of Octo I never had a project even in mind about filing for a COVID grant to cover extra expenses. but I found out about some funding that is avaialble to farmers in my state. So I suddenly had a project to investigate and write the grant application. And I don't think it ever made it onto any of my lists as I just worked on it until I got it nearly done. t my last weekly review I did finally add it as a project only because there are only a few actions left. Film and edit a video of my story and upload the applicationa nd files to the site for review.

The more stuff that is in your GTD system the better able you are to make good intuitive coices about what to work on.
 

Quang123

Registered
After reading this thread, I have a couple of thoughts.

It might feel like 3 years is a long time, but consider that you are still a beginner with the GTD methodology. Its a path of mastery, so try to be patient with yourself as you keep learning how to implement GTD in your world.

Some practical thoughts:

Slow down, especially in the first 3 phases (capture, clarify, organize). Most of us come upon GTD because we already have a lot to do and are motivated to do more. Hence I think we envision everything in GTD happening super fast (after all, the book is titled Getting things done...).

So we capture fast, we clarify fast, we organize fast... and then we find ourselves repelled by our lists because they are too long or irrelevant or unclear. Realize that GTD is as much a way of thinking about your work as a way of doing or organizing your work. Learning a new way of thinking takes time. Give yourself permission to slow down.

Slowing down while capturing means really emptying your head on a topic, project, or task, before tossing that note in the inbox. Capturing isn't about speed, it's about completeness.

Slowing down while clarifying means deliberately walking through the questions in the flowchart and allowing yourself to think it all the way through before deciding what, if any, action is needed. After years, I still keep a laminated copy of the flowchart at the bottom of my inbox for reference during clarifying, because it helps me slow down.

Slowing down while organizing means really considering where the best place to park your reminders will be. this is often part of clarifying, so slowing down there helps you with this step also. Many things are not obvious - for example, if you need information from someone, are you going to call them, email them, or text them? The best answer for that is going to depend on the situation, your own preferences, and your knowledge of the other persons communication style. If you jump straight to "call Jim" but you aren't fully comfortable with that mode of communication (either in general, or with Jim, or about the topic...) you will resist calling Jim and it will just hang out on your list and bother you. Or maybe you realize after that you actually need more information before you can call Jim, or maybe you need to spend a few minutes and jot down an outline of what to say, so the call is not actually the next action. Slowing down in this phase is so critical. Clarifying and organizing is not about speed it's about effectiveness.

The more complete your capturing is, the more you will trust your system.

The more precise your decisions in clarifying and organizing are, the smoother it will be to review and engage with your work. So really try to slow way down in those early phases.


Consider how you are using your calendar. Remember that your calendar is actually a next actions list - just one that's tied to dates and times. I struggled for a long time putting things on next action lists that really belonged in my calendar, because they required a certain amount of time to complete. This is especially true if you work in a high-meeting environment. Theres a misconception that David discourages scheduling actions on the calendar. As long as that decision is intentionally made in the clarifying process, its totally consistent with GTD. Some frequent posters on the forum are big advocates of time-blocking, like @Longstreet.

A few things to consider with your calendar:
1. Do you have enough clarifying time daily? - most people need at least 1 hour to 90 minutes (cumulatively) of free space each workday in order to process inputs effectively
2. What kinds of things do you need to be scheduling? given the pace of my workday, generally I consider scheduling any task that requires more than 30 minutes of uninterrupted time, or a special degree of mental focus. If i have to cancel these "self-appointments", they move to my next action lists as a "schedule xx hours for [task]", rather than simply getting deleted.

Optimizing your use of calendar can offload some key things from your next action lists.

Hope it helps :)

I had the feeling that should slow down because after using my 5th software tool, I started to ramp down my todo's which helped but it did not allow me to really use the GTD mythology. What I did not do was slow down and clarify clearly with what really needed to be done.
When you mean to give myself 1 hour to process inputs effectively, are you referring to processing my inbox? Take the team to process it slowly and thoroughly?
Yes, I should see it as a process of mastery. I am glad I stuck it out. I am optimist that I will get this system down well and reap the benefits of that mind like water space I keep hearing so much about with managing my daily commitments.
 

Quang123

Registered
A side question: You mention a context "todo". But everything is stuff to do. It sounds like you may not be using contexts as GTD intends?

More generally: It sounds like you're putting everything you think you might need to do in your main GTD lists, the ones that you would be scanning every day, and trying to cope with the length of the resulting lists.

I would suggest that you instead decide the list length that you can tolerate--five projects? Twenty? Ninety?--and put everything else into Someday/Maybe.

Also, while many projects don't actually have dependencies, you're unlikely to do certain proects at the same time as other projects. For example, I could have projects for the fall garden that say:

- Plant garlic
- Put the asparagus to bed for winter
- Prep the back of rows 2 and 3 for perennials.
- Clear the onion bed.
- Prep the front of row 4 for peas.

and dozens of others. (Yeah, I'm not bothering with outcome-based project titles for this example.)

But I'm not going to get more than two garden projects done per week. I'm just not. So everything but one or two goes into a Someday/Maybe list called "Garden Thoughts". When I finish a project, I can go read that list for the next one.

Similar for the novel I'm writing. I have a list of "Scenes I need", with a couple of dozen things in it. But that's Someday/Maybe; the only thing that would be in my main GTD lists would be "Write a scene". That gives me the flexibility to go look at Scenes I Need to see what I'm in the mood to write, but it keeps Scenes I Need from cluttering up my lists.

There's an ocean of things you could do. For your GTD lists, take an eyedropper and take out just a few drops.
Ok got it. will only include those next actions that I can actually do until the next weekly review otherwise my next action list is too long with irrelevant next actions that I would not be able to do anyways in the time slot of a week or until my next weekly review. Thanks!
 

Quang123

Registered
What you wish for happens in my opinion in the weekly review. You decide what to do and where to put focus on. When you start to act, you have the freedom to choose from your next action list. I can relate a little to what you write. But for me it‘s more the acceleration of work. I feel I can do much more and my system allows me to do that, but I wonder whether at some time I stumble upon my own feet. Then I ask myself what is the alternative? GTD is nevertheless the best option for me.

On the other hand: Why not put recreational activities into your system? At the end you should strive for balance. If you just put into your system what you have to do (like work related stuff) and not e.g. chat with friends, then it may feel like you described.
good point. will think about adding that to my GTD system.
 

Quang123

Registered
There is a lot of great advice here but I just want to point you to FacileThings. I have tried lots and lots of tools and I have always come back to FacileThings. It really keeps you honest to the GTD system as it is as pure to the framework as I have found. I love it and find it really keeps me on check with the system.
it seems on the pricey side esp since it is a subscription service. $84 per year. But will consider it. Thanks!
 
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