anti failure implementation of GTD

Discussion in 'PUBLIC: Discuss the GTD Methodology' started by bcool, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Geeko

    Geeko GTD since 2017

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    That strongly depends on your role in that organization.
    If you are on the top you can easily establish some GTD-like workflow and define processes in a GTD-way.
    The further down you are in the food-chain the more subtle your approach has to be. Maybe you get an opportunity to create or improve any processes in your organization.
    But even if you are at the very bottom-line, there is still a way you can spread GTD in your organization: Implement it yourself, be on top of everything and look like you have fun doing so ;) Eventually your superior will ask how you get all your stuff done and that’s when your opportunity strikes.

    Just one last advice: Do not push or force anybody to use GTD. Because if you do so, they will implement it reluctantly and always feel a resistance to it. But give people guidance, if they ask for it.

    Cheers,
    Tristan
     
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  2. John Forrister

    John Forrister Moderator

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    One can implement GTD in any organization. One can personally begin practicing the GTD methodology and see how others respond. One may provide an example that inspires others in the organization, and how they respond is up to them.

    If the organization (and that probably means one person or a very small group) wants to implement GTD in the organization, the short and challenging answer is Holacracy. It has a constitution that builds in many GTD principles, including projects and next actions, clear ownership of projects, efficient clarification of inputs, and meaningful meetings. (For example, the tactical meeting framework is analogous to GTD's approach to clarifying items in an inbox. What is it? what's the next action? and so on.) I could go on at length, but generally people need to read past the misinformation and get familiar with their organization's pain points to make more discussion helpful.
     
  3. TesTeq

    TesTeq Registered

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    And one more thing: to make organizational changes in any organization you have to have power.
    "Every decision is made by the person who has the power to make that decision - not the 'right' person, or the 'smartest' person, or the 'best' person." - Marshall Goldsmith
     
  4. Geeko

    Geeko GTD since 2017

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    That’s exactly why I think that @John Forrister’s approach is a very ambitious one. In most organizations the people with power are not willing to give that power up. You at DAC are very lucky to be able to live this approach.

    I think that in traditional organizations it is very difficult to instate a holacracy. You really have to convince the right people and these people have to convince the board and so on. That’s a rather difficult process. I would really like to experience myself what working in a holacracy is like. I’m sure that would be a very interesting experience.

    Cheers,
    Tristan

    edit: fixed links
     
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