If new project: when to create all necessary actions (using Nirvana)

Marelva

Registered
Hello,
I started GTD a few months ago using NirvanaHQ and I love it.
But something I don't quite understand.
When starting a project, when do you create all actions?
Option 1: whenever you want. But....in Nirvana, when you do not make at least one action, the project doesn't appear on your next action list. So then I would have to always check not only the next action list but also the project list for not overlooking anything.
Option 2: at least 1 next action when making a new project. That way you don't have to check the project list all the time. But then you have to remember each time you finish a task, to immediately create the next action. It would resolve itself on my once a week maintenance hour, but then you would slow down your project only because there aren't yet any tasks.
Option 3: when you start/type a new project, you immediately determine all actions necessary to finish the project. But that's not always a simple task. I am very strict (or at least I try to be) in only creating very doable tasks. So chopping up a project in only easy one step doable tasks that work for me, takes time.

So, how do you guys do that?

(Excuse my English is not my first language)
 

TesTeq

Registered
When starting a project, when do you create all actions?
@Marelva Never. I define the successful outcome of the Project and the first Next Action. Optionally I put some additional info in the Project notes (sometimes I include some next Next Actions if there's something non-obvious).
 

RobertWall

Registered
Between option 2 and option 3 for me. I was working with somebody once that had a project roughly like this:

Return item to friend
* Find item
* Get envelope
* Get stamps
* Email friend to get address
* Address envelope
* Put item in envelope
* Put envelope in mailbox

They 2-minute-ruled "email friend to get address", looked through the desk and checked off "get envelope" and "get stamps", so what was left was

Return item to friend
* Find item
* Put item in envelope
* Waiting for friend to send address
* Address envelope
* Put envelope in mailbox

They recorded all of that in their system as a combo of parallel / sequential projects. That way when they finished "find item", "put item in envelope" came up next automatically. And when the friend sent the address, "address envelope" would come up next automatically. And of course once those were both done, "put envelope in mailbox" came up next automatically.

There's not a strict *need* to do that level of granularity, but if you've already thought it through I don't see the harm in recording it.

The time when it's beneficial *NOT* to record everything is when it's causing you to sit there and try to exhaustively anticipate every contingency, or when some of the future is unknown. "Meet with Frank re: project" legitimately might change everything you thought you knew about what you were supposed to do, so planning beyond that may be wasted time / effort.
 
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